Introducing the Seasonax Web App

Acting-Man

Closing the Affordability Gap

Up until recently, the Seasonax app was only available to users of Bloomberg or Reuters terminals, putting it out of reach of most non-institutional investors. This has now changed. A  HYPERLINK “https://app.seasonax.com/”web-based version has become available which anyone can use, and it comes at a much lower price point as well. When visiting the site where the app is hosted, this is the welcome screen:

Featured patterns at the Seasonax web app page

Featured patterns can be explored for free – these are occasionally  changed/updated, but will always feature stocks with interesting individual seasonal trend characteristics. After you register with the site (for free), additional freely accessible featured patterns will become available.

In short, there is plenty of stuff to play around with at no cost if you just want to explore the app and its functions. Full functionality will become available once you subscribe.

We already described the main functions of the Seasonax app in the context of the Bloomberg/Reuters version, so if you are not familiar with it and want to know what it can do, you can start by reading our introduction here:  HYPERLINK “http://www.acting-man.com/?page_id=49532”Seasonax – What It Is And What It Can Do For You.

Obviously, the first sentence stating that the app is only available on Bloomberg and Reuters is no longer true, but all the other features described in the introduction are available on the web app as well. There are a few small differences though, which we will address further below.

But first, here is a look at the web app in action – this example shows a 33-year seasonal chart of gold, on which we have highlighted the time period from today (August 10) to October 8, the next seasonal interim peak. All the statistics you see on the right hand side and in the smaller windows below the main chart window refer exclusively to this time period. This is a chart without filters applied.

The list at the bottom is cut off on this screenshot – it shows all the details for this time period for every single year contained in the 33-year seasonal average. In the app you can scroll down and see the other years as well.

Gold, 33-year seasonal chart with the time period August 10 – October 8 selected.

33 years is the longest seasonal chart available for gold, but shorter time periods can of course be chosen as well (as a tip, per experience it is well worth looking at more than one time period and also make use of the filtering options).

The app is very easy to understand and operate. Here is a brief tutorial video that shows how it’s done:



Seasonax app – a brief tutorial for beginners

Differences Between the Terminal and Web App Versions

So what is the difference between the web version and the Bloomberg version? The web version …read more

Source:: Acting Man